A.K.A. Kaos

 

Captain of the Chattanooga Roller Girls Kadi Rogers, also known as Quads of Kaos, is confident, competitive, and determined to go further. She’s played many sports in her life, but none have come close to the passion she has for derby. From cross training in the gym to attending every practice, Kaos spends hours every week dedicated to the sport and improving her game. Derby isn’t your everyday kind of sport, but the tight-nit community and safe space it offers to be yourself made it an easy choice for Kaos to stay and learn. With her sparkly blue lipstick and badass attitude, Kaos is ready to rock your world.

 

Meet The Storytellers

Allie Schrenker

Allie Schrenker is a committed athlete majoring in Communication and Creative Writing at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with plans to graduate in May 2019. She is an international rugby player and an editor for UTC’s literary journal. She is currently pursuing a career in photojournalism and can be reached at kcb325@mocs.utc.edu.

 

Life as a Single Mother

Every morning, Alexa McDonald makes coffee while she prepares her sons breakfast.
November 21, 2018 (photo by Princess Petrus)

Alexa McDonald is a 24-year-old girl who is known for her striking beauty, big red hair, and elaborate makeup. She is the front desk supervisor at the Chattanooga DoubleTree downtown and has been residing in the Chattanooga area for about two years now. She is a mother to a one-year old son named Silas James Patrick McDonald, born on September 27, 2017.

Alexa McDonald applies her makeup as her son reaches for her attention.
November 21, 2018 (photo by Princess Petrus)

Unfortunately, Silas’s father was addicted to opioids and had extreme temperamental issues that led to aggression and violence. McDonald made the choice to raise Silas on her own–knowing it would be difficult–but the best choice for them both.

Alexa McDonald assists her coworker with a guest’s reservation.
October 11, 2018 (photo by Princess Petrus)

McDonald has been working hard at her full-time job moving towards her goal of becoming a General Manager. She has been in the hotel industry for almost five years and only plans to move up. Through this journey, her mother has been an important asset in regard to childcare of Silas. With McDonald’s mother being retired, she helps create a more flexible schedule for work and schooling.

Alexa McDonald coddles her son after bumping his head on the hardwood floor.
November 21, 2018 (photo by Princess Petrus)

In 2015, McDonald earned her associate degree in business and financing at Horry Georgetown Technical College in Conway, South Carolina. To add to her credentials, she plans to go back to school this Spring to continue her education at UTC.

Alexa McDonald straps her one year old son in a baby carrier before leaving her house.
November 21, 2018 (photo by Princess Petrus)

 

Princess Petrus, a Communications junior at UTC, has a passion for hospitality and enjoys photojournalism. She currently works at the DoubleTree by Hilton in downtown Chattanooga, and plans to become a flight attendant upon graduating. Her degree as well as her minor in Spanish will allow her to better interact with others across the world.

 

 

 

Charlye White-One day at a time

 

Brianna (Charlye) White is both a student at UTC and a single mother to her son, Princeton. For the past two years, she has been juggling her course work, her job, and motherhood. She talks about her struggles, and how she manages balancing all of her responsibilities. By taking it day by day, Charlye White will graduate with a BA in Communications this December 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers

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Allie Schrenker

Allie Schrenker is a committed athlete studying Communications and Creative Writing at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with plans to graduate in May 2019. She is one of the editors for UTC’s literary journal and is currently pursuing a career in photojournalism.

 

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Troy Stolt

Troy Stolt is a student photojournalist based out of Chattanooga Tennessee, where he is the photo editor of the UTC student newspaper, the University Echo, he has experience covering news, sports, in the creation of multimedia, studio portraits as well as making featured photos. His work has also been published University relations, Nooga.com, and the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

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Cade Deakin

Cade Deakin is a photographer and videographer based in Chattanooga, who has worked at the student newspaper, The University Echo, while completing a communications degree at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and completed a media internship making promotional photos and videos at Songbirds Guitar Museum.

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Alex Ogle: Sights Set High

Written by: Katie Haremski
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Alex Ogle makes a photo during her Echo photo assignment at Main X 24. Saturday, December 1, 2018. Photo by: Katie Haremski

UTC Communications and Psychology junior, Alex Ogle, has her sights set high as she approaches her last year of college. While a projection for early graduation came as a bit of a surprise, she couldn’t be more excited for what the future has in store. For many, college is a time of exploration of one’s self and Ogle is no exception from that. During her time in college she has explored several different paths specifically in the Communications Department.

The Knoxville native kick started her college career in the fall of 2016. Over the past two and a half years, she has found a deep love for broadcasting and photojournalism. While Ogle claims that she is “not musically talented”, she has a deeply embedded love for music. Her love for music brought her to having her own show on WUTC. She said, “It’s cool to be able to play whatever music you want”.

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Alex Ogle signs her photo. Her photo will be hung in the COMM department. Wednesday, November 28, 2018. Photo by: Katie Haremski

Additionally, she loves photojournalism. What started as a class, has now become a passion. Ogle is currently in her first class in photojournalism, but will be continuing her “PJ” education next semester. At the end of the October, she joined The UTC Echo Photographers and feels like since joining she has grown in her craft.

What some may not know, is that Ogle is legally blind. Her right eye is corrected to 20/60 but her left eye is 20/300. She doesn’t have peripheral in either eye due to retinopathy of prematurity. Despite that, Ogle said that it is not a defining factor of who she is.

“I love capturing moments and reminding people that [this] is what is going on. That photos can lead to change.” Ogle said that it’s really special that one can capture a moments in time.

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Alex Ogle waits for photo to print out. Her photo will be hung in the COMM department. Wednesday, November 28, 2018. Photo by: Katie Haremski

 

She said that when she first started photographing she “didn’t feel like she was good at it” but as time has past, she has continued to make connections and photos. While “the dream” is unclear, she goes back and forth on whether she wants to seek after photojournalism as a profession. One thing is clear, is that she does have passion for storytelling and capturing emotion.

Ogle’s WUTC show can be heard on Mondays at 10 PM and her work in The Echo can be found on http://www.theutcecho.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers

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Katie Haremski

Katie Haremski is a senior at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Outside of contributing to Rising Rock, she is the Creative Coordinator at Counsel Creative and the Features Editor at The Echo. Katie is a storyteller, writer, designer, social media marketer and photographer.

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

 

USA Boxing

Written by: Abby Ray

 

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Montreal Hunter (blue) punches Mauricio Quintanilla (red) during their fight at the USA Boxing Eastern Elite Qualifiers in Chattanooga on Monday, October 8, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

During October 7th – 13th Chattanooga hosted the 2018 Eastern Elite Qualifier and Regional Boxing Championships. The event was held at the Chattanooga Convention Center and had the largest turnout in national tournament history according to TeamUSA.org. Chattanooga has hosted the Eastern Elite Qualifiers two consecutive years since 2017.

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Deontay Brown (blue) kneels down before the begging of his bout at the USA Boxing Eastern Elite Qualifiers in Chattanooga on Tuesday, October 9, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

“After check-in and general weigh-in, a total of 834 boxers and 550 boxers will take part in the weeklong national tournament at the Chattanooga Convention Center,” from TeamUSA.org. Due to the large amount of boxers, a 5th ring was added to accommodate the amount of participants.

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The USA vs Germany boxing matches in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, October 12, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

The tournament had Elite, Youth, Junior, Intermediate, Bantam, and PeeWee divisions. Elite Boxers must be 18 years old and have at least 5 years of experience under their belt. The rest of the divisions have boxers who are 17 years old to just 8 years old. The tournament also had female and male boxing divisions.

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The USA vs Germany boxing matches in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, October 12, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

In order to ensure the boxers safety, ring side physicians are present during every bout. The physicians follow concussion protocol and are aware of the early signs of one. Dr. Armando Sanchez was the lead physician at the Qualifiers.

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The USA vs Germany boxing matches in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, October 12, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

The winning boxers from the Eastern Elite Qualifier and Regional Boxing Championships are one step closer to qualifying for the 2020 Summer Olympics.

 

 

 

 

Concussions in Boxing:

Written by: Ayriel Ayers
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Christina Cruz (red) punches Azizo Nimani (blue) during the USA vs Germany boxing matches in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, October 12, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

Webster’s definition of a concussion is an injury to the brain that results in temporary loss of normal brain function. Concussions in the Chattanooga area are a prominent issue in today’s sports realm. According to NATA Journals, Men’s boxing has one of the highest rates of concussions, with a 34% rate out of every 1,000 players, according to wiki statistics.How do you recognize the signs of concussion in a young athlete? To begin, a concussion does not have to be a result of a blow to the head with “blacking out” occurring. Concussions can occur with shaking or rapid head movements and more often than not leave the athlete fully conscious.

“The Brain is the brain. Concussions don’t change. Boxing isn’t the worst sport, but it’s more acceptable to gaining a concussion. the boxers are in a sport that can potentially give them a concussions,” Dr. Armando, boxing medical specialist gives us a more professional insight on boxing with concussions. Armando said,“you want to attack the issue way before it happens, limit those chances of a concussion, anytime you feel there could potentially be something wrong, get it checked out.”

Boxing is a form of fighting, which according to Dr.Armando is “Human Nature” the fighting wont stop, but preventing concussions is possible.

 

 

 

 

 

About the Storytellers

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Abby Ray

Abby Ray, a senior at UTC studying Communications and Business Administration, is from Memphis, Tennessee. She currently works as an intern at Delegator, which is a digital advertising agency in Chattanooga. A few of Ray’s passions are working out, watching the Memphis Grizzlies and scrolling through twitter.

 

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Elian Richter

Elian Richter is an climbing instructor and action photographer. Elian works at High Point Climbing gym as a certified instructor and as a backup photographer. He now combines the skills learned from climbing with the skills he’s acquired in photography to do photo shoots for climbers and outdoors enthusiasts.

 

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Ayriel Ayers

Ayriel Ayers is a senior at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She’s skilled in photography, human development, and public relations. As the NAACP President, Resident Assistant for UTC housing, and a Community Service and Membership Development Chairwoman for her sorority, her leadership and positivity characteristics continually pointed her to success.

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Chasing Steam

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Bob Kelley shoots a video of the Tennessee Railroad Museum’s steam engine as it goes over a bridge in Trion, Georgia on October 21, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

On certain weekends throughout the year, photographers from all over the south make a trip to Chattanooga, Tenn. in order to photograph the steam engines at the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum.

Often described as a moving museum, The Tennessee Valley Railroad offers an interactive, historical experience that adds an extra dimension to a visit to one of Chattanooga’s popular attractions. Not only is this museum a fun experience for visitors and locals alike, but the only regularly scheduled, full-sized train ride in Tennessee is offered at this museum.

With these factors taken into account, it is most fitting that photographers, artists, and admirers come to experience these steam engines.

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The Tennessee Valley Railroad museum steam engine #630 rolls through Rossville Boulevard in Chattanooga, Tennessee on October 21, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

One specific steam engine ride in particular, the Summerville Steam Special, follows a historic route from Grand Junction Station in Chattanooga to Summerville, GA, crossing the state line at Rossville and traveling past Chickamauga National Military Park and through Chickamauga, Rock Spring, Lafayette, and Trion.

This nine hour steam engine ride recently attracted photographers from the North Georgia Photography Club.

Numerous photographers from this prestigious club showed up on Oct. 21 to photograph the Summerville Steam Engine.

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Members of the North Georgia Photography club photograph the Tennessee valley Railroad museum’s steam engine made in 1911 as it pulls into Summerville station on October 21, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

 

Bob Kelley, member of the North Georgia Photography Club and leader of the train chases, has traveled to photograph these trains about ten to fifteen times and tries to go every chance he can get.

By calling this photography excursion a “once in a lifetime opportunity,” Kelley realizes the importance and fun of photographers experiencing these Chattanooga steam engines and encourages his club to come as often as they can.

In order to capture the smoke, the speed, and the beauty of these trains, photographers like Kelley have to chase the steam engines in their trucks.

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Chuck Baumracker waits with his camera in hand on the arrival of the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum’s steam engine in Rossville on October 21, 2018. Chuck had travelled 100 miles to photograph the train on its 60 mile trip from Chattanooga to Summerville, Georgia (Photo by Troy Stolt).

“It can be extremely dangerous being that close to something so powerful, but it is one of the most exciting parts. Riding behind them is a rush of adrenaline,” Kelley said.

By strategically planning the nine hour day photographing these trains, photographers like Kelley make sure to take numerous factors into account. According to Kelley, he takes note of the arrival time to each location, traces the route on Google Earth, looks up each GPS coordinate, prepares camera setting in advance, and makes sure he is safe by keeping off of the tracks and out of the way.

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A member of the North Georgia Photography club photographs the Tennessee valley Railroad museum’s steam engine made in 1911 as it pulls into Ringold train station on October 21, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

Even though this is one the club’s favorite photography opportunities, numerous challenges can come into play. According to Kelley, each photography will face the problems of keeping up with the trains, trying not to get lost, paying attention to safety, and arriving at the right time.

However, even though struggles and challenges may arise, Kelley and the club understand the exciting and historical elements in these photographs.

“Why would you miss out on such a cool opportunity? It is rare that we live so close to such a magnificent piece of history and there are few railroads in America that you can ride on steam trains,” Kelley said.

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The Tennessee Valley Railroad museum steam engine #630 runs from Chattanooga, Tennessee to Summerville, Georgia on October 21, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

With the excitement of just one club photographing these steam engines, there are still so many other opportunities to capture the history and beauty of the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum in this city, Chattanooga, Tenn.

The upcoming Summerville Steam Engine trips and last three ones for this year will be on Nov. 3, 10, and 11.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers:

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Troy Stolt

Troy Stolt is a student photojournalist based out of Chattanooga Tennessee, where he is the photo editor of the UTC student newspaper, the University Echo, he has experience covering news, sports, in the creation of multimedia, studio portraits as well as making featured photos. His work has also been published University relations, Nooga.com, and the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

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Abigail Frazier

Abigail Frazier is a senior communications major at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She works for the student newspaper, The University Echo, as the News Editor. Frazier hopes to pursue print journalism or an online publication in News Media.

 

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Jessica Boggs

Jessica Boggs, Senior at UTC, is pursuing a degree in Communication and minoring in International Relations. She is an experienced international photojournalist as well as feature photographer for The Echo. Jessica is passionate about speaking for those without a voice through the lens of a camera.

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Raising the Flags

 

 

 

In 1970 members of Ringgold Georgia community started a tradition to honor the deceased Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, who were residents of Catoosa County at some point. At the time there was only one flag honoring all veterans, but members of the VFW decided each veteran should have a flag of their own. The tradition began with 12 flags that were placed in the Anderson Cemetery in Ringgold. Over the next 46 years the number of flags grew tremendously.

Each year, a week before Memorial Day and a week before Veterans Day volunteers from the Catoosa County area and surrounding areas place American flags along Ringgold’s streets and highways. They are placed on metal poles and a white wooden cross with the name of the veteran, their branch of service, and the war from the American Revolution to Iraq and Afghanistan. A week before and after the two holidays the flags are up for display to honor the Veterans.

For many years Ralph Teems, his cousin Charles Teems (both VFW members) and Wallace Hall who made some of the first crosses volunteered labor initiative. The position was then given to Gilbert Childer, Head of the Volunteers. Dozens of volunteers have help put this event together each year. From Ringgold, Ridgeland, and Heritage middle and high school students making, painting, and placing the cross to volunteers from all ages, churches, civic organizations, and more. Today there are over a thousand of flags that are displayed and each year a hundred flags are added.

 

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers

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Allie Schrenker

Allie Schrenker is a committed athlete studying Communications and Creative Writing at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with plans to graduate in May 2019. She is one of the editors for UTC’s literary journal and is currently pursuing a career in photojournalism.

 
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Tiffany Closson

Tiffany Closson is a senior marketing major at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She studied luxury fashion in Paris and has spent time in photojournalism working with local stories. As a marketing intern she has knowledge in website analytics and social media management.

 

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Brianna (Charlye) White

Brianna (Charlye) White is in her senior year at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, majoring in Communications. She is the Community Outreach Assistant for the Bethlehem Center, and a Writer and News Anchor for her school news media, Mocs News. Visitwww.thbeth.org to view her work and email her at white.brianna17@gmail.com to learn more.
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Jackson Hollis

Jackson Hollis has been a photojournalist for the UTC Echo for almost a year. He has shot many events for the paper including including parades, rally’s, sports events, and more. Jackson has lived in Chattanooga for over 3 years and loves sports and the outdoors. Jackson can be contacted either by cell (615) 479-5115 or by email jvaughnhollis@gmail.com.

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.