Tag: Chattanooga

Ghosts – The Hunt

 

 

 

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In this eerie Rising Rock special, we followed Mystique Paranormal, a local Chattanooga paranormal investigation team. The team investigated the home of a group member where paranormal activity has been reported multiple times. We discussed paranormal experiences that the group has had and why they do what they do. We figured out possible reasons for the ghost activity in and around the house, and we had a few out of the ordinary experiences of our own.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers

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Savannah Champion

Savannah Champion is a Junior at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.  She also works as a Marketing Coordinator for a local infrastructure company, where she utilizes her love for content writing and graphic design to create clear and consistent messaging.

 

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Cade Deakin

Cade Deakin is a photographer and videographer based in Chattanooga, who has worked at the student newspaper, The University Echo, while completing a communications degree at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and completed a media internship making promotional photos and videos at Songbirds Guitar Museum.

 

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Nik Jones

Nik Jones is a senior communications student at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with experience in photojournalism. He is passionate about art in its many forms, but more importantly people and the stories they have to tell.

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Time

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What is time? Three UTC students sat down with Dr. Joshua Hamblen, a UTC physics professor, who contemplates the meaning of time and its effects on us. With the time change coming up on November 4, 2018, everyone will set their clocks back one hour, effectively losing one hour of daylight each day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers

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Katie Haremski

Katie Haremski is a senior at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Outside of contributing to Rising Rock, she is the Creative Coordinator at Counsel Creative and the Features Editor at The Echo. Katie is a storyteller, writer, designer, social media marketer and photographer.

 

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Ashley Rutledge

Ashley Rutledge, a Chattanooga native and senior communication student at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, plans to work in the marketing industry after graduation. Her skills include social media management, public relations and graphic design.

 

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Phillip Kiefer

Phillip Kiefer is an international Musician and amateur photojournalist with skills in multimedia production and marketing strategies. He is a senior at UTC studying communication and anthropology. His interests in local music and the outdoors drive him to produce fun and informative stories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Barber Kings – Chattanooga One Snip at a Time

 

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Chris Palmer edges a clients hair on September 10, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

Barber Kings, a well-known barber shop on MLK Boulevard in Chattanooga, Tenn., creates a space where area neighborhoods find community.

Established in 2013 by owner Victor Bronson, Barber Kings has been a place where the people of the MLK Neighborhood Association frequent on a daily basis.

Not only can people walk in to receive a professional cut or shave from one of their barbers, they can also come in to spend hours of time with their neighbors.

 

 

 

According to Master Barber Chris Palmer, Barber Kings is a place to not only receive a good haircut, but also a good conversation. By growing up spending time in barber shops himself, Palmer understands the effect a barber shop can have on people.

“As a kid, going to the barber shop was like going on a field trip. It was a place to sit and listen, to have conversations with the barber and the people who lived in this community,” Palmer said.  

By having a personal experience and understanding of the effects a barber shop can have on someone, Palmer and the other barbers work hard to make this shop a place for community.

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Messiah waits for a haircut at Barber Kings on Martin Luther King Boulevard on September 8, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

“We try to make this a place where boys can learn how to become young men,” Palmer said, “We want to be there to help mentor the children that come and sit in our chairs.”

Even with all of their passion for their work and the people they encounter, Barber Kings recently changed locations due to the gentrification of MLK Boulevard.

The landscape of MLK and the neighborhood has drastically changed over the years. What used to be a street made up of predominantly black business owners has been flooded with people from the nearby neighborhoods and has changed to appeal and conform to a younger, middle-class taste.

 

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Terrance Bragg cuts a client’s hair at Barber Kings on Martin Luther King Blvd on September 8, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

These changes have allowed new shops, bars and restaurants to open up along MLK Boulevard as well as allow more college students, tourists and locals enjoy what this part of Chattanooga has to offer. The new businesses like OddStory Brewing Company, 2 Sons Kitchen and Market, Hutton & Smith Brewing, and The Camp House to name a few, fall under the category of change on this street. Unfortunately, because of this change, Barber Kings could no longer stay in their previous location on MLK.

With these changes, Barber Kings had to face the choice of leaving a neighborhood they had spent years building a community with or work hard to stay and continue being involved with their neighborhood.

The shop ended up remaining on MLK, but changing locations to a little ways down the road. Barber Kings is currently located next door to Hutton & Smith Brewing and across the street from Champy’s Restaurant at 517 East Martin Luther King Boulevard.

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Terrance Bragg shaves his face with a straight edge razor on September 10, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

Having been around this community for many years, the barbers have seen shops come and go. They are aware of these changes, but they are prepared to face them together and adapt how they see fit.

“I know lots of families who have moved out of this neighborhood. They talk about the way things used to be around here, how it made them strong,” Palmer said.

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Terrance Bragg finishes a clients hair September 6th, 2018. Jessica Boggs

By seeing other businesses let these changes move them out, Palmer and the shop understand how different this neighborhood used to be. However, it is also important to them to be a part of this newly formed community inhabiting the neighborhood.

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The Barber kings staff cut clients hair on September 7, 2018 (Photo by Troy Stolt).

“These are the streets that musicians like Bessie Smith and James Brown used to roam. As this neighborhood experiences a shift from gentrification, it’s important to us to be an example for other ethnic owned businesses in this community. We don’t want to lose that history,” Palmer said.

Barber Kings is a business that does not let gentrification force them out of a place they call home. These barbers and this company represent strength, community and history in an important part of the city of Chattanooga.

 

 

Meet the Storytellers:

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Troy Stolt

Troy Stolt is a student photojournalist based out of Chattanooga Tennessee, where he is the photo editor of the UTC student newspaper, the University Echo, he has experience covering news, sports, in the creation of multimedia, studio portraits as well as making featured photos. His work has also been published University relations, Nooga.com, and the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

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Abigail Frazier

Abigail Frazier is a senior communications major at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She works for the student newspaper, The University Echo, as the News Editor. Frazier hopes to pursue print journalism or an online publication in News Media.

 

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Jessica Boggs

Jessica Boggs, Senior at UTC, is pursuing a degree in Communication and minoring in International Relations. She is an experienced international photojournalist as well as feature photographer for The Echo. Jessica is passionate about speaking for those without a voice through the lens of a camera.

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

 

 

 

Chattahooligans

chattahooliganposterFINALjpg.jpgThe Chattahooligan feature is designed to do two things: to familiarize the viewer with the Chattanooga Football Club fan base known as The Chattahooligans, and to highlight their influence in the city by showing their support for Operation Get Active (an organization started through the CFC Foundation).  

In this multimedia piece, three Chattahooligans are interviewed at an OGA event, and while each are interviewed separately, they all touch on the importance of building community through organizations like OGA, which emphasizes inclusiveness, and giving everyone the opportunity to participate.  Inclusiveness and opportunity are two core ideals in the The Chattahooligan fan base, and while they are comprised of many members, with each having varying levels of interest in the game, each ultimately share the same passion for cultivating community in Chattanooga.

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers

savannahcSavannah Champion

Savannah Champion is a Junior at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.  She also works as a Marketing Coordinator for a local infrastructure company, where she utilizes her love for content writing and graphic design to create clear and consistent messaging.

 

Cade Deakin ECHO WEBCade Deakin

Cade Deakin is a photographer and videographer based in Chattanooga, who has worked at the student newspaper, The University Echo, while completing a communications degree at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and completed a media internship making promotional photos and videos at Songbirds Guitar Museum. 

 

nik jones portraitNik Jones

Nik Jones is a senior communications student at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with experience in photojournalism. He is passionate about art in its many forms, but more importantly people and the stories they have to tell.

 

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Why We Walk

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Christian Watson participates in the UTC ROTC’s 11 Hours of Remembrance around Chamberlain field. The memorial went from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m., making sure that the American flag never stopped circling the field. Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018 (Photo by Allie Schrenker)

Captain Kevin Beavers walked onto Chamberlain field with one goal in mind–to remember the impact of 9/11.

“We’re just having conversations,” Beavers said. “The biggest thing with us, in the military, is that we never forget. Someone is truly never forgotten as long as you speak their name.”

From 6 a.m. to 5 p.m., Captain Beavers encouraged people to show up, be patriotic, and tell their stories. And for 11 hours, the American flag never stopped circulating the field, passing from one pair of hands to another.

Both UTC students and members of the public were encouraged to show their support by walking or running laps around Chamberlain field.

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UTC students Rhonda Watts, Brooke Burns, Morgan Hill, nd Pare Penne carry lags around Chamberlain Field in memory of 9/11, on Tuesday September 11, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

Candy Johnson, a community member and apart of the Chancellor’s Multicultural task force, participated in the event. Johnson was in college when she heard about 9/11. “I thought the world was ending,” Johnson said, “I thought we were going to have another world war.”

Johnson said her participation in this event was out of reverence than respect and that she was “honoring the military for continuing the mission that was established that day.”

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Stephen Zurlo carries an America flag around Chamberlain Field as part of a memorial service for 9/11 on Tuesday, September 11, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter) Zurlo said that he was in New York, at the age of four, during the time of the attack in 2001 and feels that he has a personal connection to the event.

However, some participants were too young to really recall much of the events of 9/11. Mason Beebe, a senior and member of UTC’s ROTC program, said, “I remember seeing it on TV and that it was a really big deal. It took a couple years to sink in.”

Eventually the impact did sink in. “It was an affirmation for me,” he said, referring to the events of 9/11, “This is why I want to serve.”

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Christian Watson (left) and Bailey Ferguson (right) march around Chamberlain field to show their respects for the victims of 9/11 during UTC ROTC’s 11 Hours of Remembrance. Tuesday, September 11, 2018. (photo by Allie Schrenker)

Many different groups came out and showed their support during UTC ROTC’s event, “11 Hours of Remembrance.” Members of fraternities, sororities, and athletic teams walked laps around the field, holding the American flag high. Many veterans and current servicemen also paid their respects.

Avery Hurst, a member of the community and surgeon for the armed forces, also participated in the event. Like Mason Beebe, Hurst used the tragic event to fuel her own inner fire, inspiring her to become a surgeon and join the military. Hurst dedicated her walk to both her “strong roots in service” and the heroism of the first responders.

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Army Recruiter Justin Jones participates in UTC ROTC’s event, 11 Hours of Remembrance on Tuesday, September 11, 2018. (photo by Allie Schrenker)

Captain Beavers wanted Chattanooga to remember the victims of 9/11 and the impact it’s had in this country. He set out to connect the past, present, and future of those who experienced it first hand and those who have only heard about it through history books. And through this event, “11 Hours of Remembrance,” he did exactly that.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Storytellers

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Allie Schrenker

Allie Schrenker is a committed athlete studying Communications and Creative Writing at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with plans to graduate in May 2019. She is one of the editors for UTC’s literary journal and is currently pursuing a career in photojournalism.

 
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Tiffany Closson

Tiffany Closson is a senior marketing major at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She studied luxury fashion in Paris and has spent time in photojournalism working with local stories. As a marketing intern she has knowledge in website analytics and social media management.

 

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Brianna (Charlye) White

Brianna (Charlye) White is in her senior year at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, majoring in Communications. She is the Community Outreach Assistant for the Bethlehem Center, and a Writer and News Anchor for her school news media, Mocs News. Visit www.thbeth.org to view her work and email her at white.brianna17@gmail.com to learn more.
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Jackson Hollis

Jackson Hollis has been a photojournalist for the UTC Echo for almost a year. He has shot many events for the paper including including parades, rally’s, sports events, and more. Jackson has lived in Chattanooga for over 3 years and loves sports and the outdoors. Jackson can be contacted either by cell (615) 479-5115 or by email jvaughnhollis@gmail.com.

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Elian Richter

Elian Richter is an climbing instructor and action photographer. Elian works at High Point Climbing gym as a certified instructor and as a backup photographer. He now combines the skills learned from climbing with the skills he’s acquired in photography to do photo shoots for climbers and outdoors enthusiasts.

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Climbing in Chattanooga

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Caleb Timmerman attempts “Rustoleum” (V6) at the Upper Middle Creek boulders on Tuesday, August 28, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

Climbing has been a part of Chattanooga since the 80’s, but Rob Robinson’s discovery of the Tennessee Wall put the city on the radar of climbers around the nation. In the past five years, the climbing scene in Chattanooga has experienced a surge in its popularity.

Outdoor hobby magazines such as Outside Magazine and Climbing Magazine recognized this boom in attention.  In 2015, Climbing magazine coined Chattanooga, “America’s new climbing capitol.”

Climbers nationally have noticed the endless amounts of climbing that Chattanooga offers and are moving here to pursue it.

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Matthew Waits attempts to climb a route named “Jahreusalem” (5.13b) at Deep Creek. Waits was accompanied by his belayer Ethan Ibach and his friend Erin Flettrich on Saturday, September 8, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

According to Chattanooga Climbing Impact Report, climbers had a total economic impact of $694,055 in Hamilton County. Additionally, 16,565 non-resident climbers visited Chattanooga in the 2015-2016 season.

“The influx of climbers is constantly outweighing the exodus of climbers in Chattanooga,” said Mike O’mara, a sales representative at High Point Climbing and experienced traditional style climber. O’mara previously lived in Illinois and would drive eight hours with the sole intent of climbing in Chattanooga. After frequent weekend excursions, he decided to make the leap to move.

“The climbing here was definitely a big factor in why I moved because it’s just that great,” said O’mara.

There are two main contributors to a great climbing environment, the rock composition and accessibility, and Chattanooga checks both of those boxes.

In this region the rock is sandstone, which has a soft but gritty texture like a fine grain sandpaper, and lends itself to better climbing.

“Chattanooga is a great place for climbing for several reasons, the sheer abundance of rock here which allows for new routes and cliff lines to be developed constantly,”said O’Mara. “The rock quality and composition is some of the best in country as far as density and hardness.”

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Matthew Waits attempts to climb a route named “Jahreusalem” (5.13b) at Deep Creek. Waits made it to the end of the climb but took a few falls along the way on Saturday, September 8, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

Although rock composition is a major factor for a climbing, accessibility is just as important.

Phil Purney, rock climber of 20 years and local climber of 10,  shed some light on what makes Chattanooga rock climbing unique to anywhere else. “It’s a fun small city, where in just a few minutes, I can be outside, out in the woods,” said Purney. “The access is not common. It’s world class convenient climbing.” Purney specializes in sport climbing, a style that emphasizes moderate to tall climbs ranging from 30ft to 120ft with a few pre-placed bolts in the wall to attach a rope to in case of a fall.

Drew Mayo is a local climber that is recognized for developing much of the Upper Middle Creek bouldering area, located on Signal Mountain. When asked about what makes Chattanooga a great climbing city Mayo said, “It’s the proximity to some of the greatest quality stone and some of the most loved stone.”

Mayo said that when he originally began developing the area, he didn’t intend on telling anyone else about his discovery, but later changed his mind and began spreading the word of this new spot.

“At first it was a selfish pursuit and then it turned into “I want to enjoy this with my friends,” said Mayo. “Only for so long can you sit there in the woods and be alone and enjoy something. Nature’s really enjoyable, but when you don’t have anyone to share it with it kinda feels a little empty.”

Although the future of Chattanooga is uncertain, the climbing community will continue to grow and evolve.

 

Climber Profile-Drew Mayo

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Drew Mayo begins a workout on gymnastic rings in the upstairs training area of a climbing gym on Sunday, September 16, 2018. (Photo by Elian Richter)

Drew Mayo is a local rock climber and dedicated developer of climbing areas in Chattanooga. The Upper Middle Creek boulders on Signal Mountain are one of the most notable areas he has helped to establish.

There are several steps that go into the process of developing a rock climbing area; his first step is to look at and examine the rock.

    “I’d usually just sit there maybe five minutes in front of the rock by myself, just looking and wondering, ‘Can I use that?’, ‘Can I grab on to that?” said Mayo. “If I did end up finding something that was usable, I would take my brush and I would try to clean off any of the lichen or moss.”

Mayo said that since the Cumberland Plateau is home to the world’s largest hardwood plateau forest, the leaf and branch buildup on these rocks can be extremely dense and take extensive amounts of time to clean.

“Usually it was like a two, three day process because once you clean all the leaves and dirt off the top, you throw that to the side, you throw that away, and usually it’s wet,” said Mayo. “So you get all the moss off and the holds that you saw, the incuts and such, they’d be soaking wet; and if you know climbing, you’re not supposed climb on wet sandstone because that’s when it becomes fragile and can break really easily.”

Mayo said at that point, he would have to wait a day, or sometimes several, until the rock was dry enough to be able to try the climb he’d worked so hard to clean.

There are still many undiscovered places around Chattanooga for climbing, said Mayo, and he already has a new location in mind to start developing this fall.

 

 

About the Storytellers

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Abby Ray

Abby Ray, a senior at UTC studying Communications and Business Administration, is from Memphis, Tennessee. She currently works as an intern at Delegator, which is a digital advertising agency in Chattanooga. A few of Ray’s passions are working out, watching the Memphis Grizzlies and scrolling through twitter.

 

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Elian Richter

Elian Richter is an climbing instructor and action photographer. Elian works at High Point Climbing gym as a certified instructor and as a backup photographer. He now combines the skills learned from climbing with the skills he’s acquired in photography to do photo shoots for climbers and outdoors enthusiasts.

 

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Ayriel Ayers

Ayriel Ayers is a senior at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. She’s skilled in photography, human development, and public relations. As the NAACP President, Resident Assistant for UTC housing, and a Community Service and Membership Development Chairwoman for her sorority, her leadership and positivity characteristics continually pointed her to success.

 

 

Copyright 2018, Rising Rock Media, all rights reserved.

Small Battles

Cameron Mulienberg’s perspective on striving for inclusivity in Highland Park.


About the Storyteller

Small Battles was created by Kristjan Grimson. This multi-media piece was made in COMM 4750, Photojournalism 2, during the Fall 2017 semester. In December 2017, he received his B.A in Communication from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.